Medicare Advantage

Medicare Advantage program is jointly executed by the Federal government and private insurance companies with some plans that can be as little as $0. Some may even include dental, vision, hearing and prescription drug coverage. Call us now to speak to a licensed medicare agent.

In choosing Medicare coverage, settling for the one that best fits you is not always easy. The two main ways to get your Medicare coverage are one original coverage—Part A and Part B—and two Medicare Advantage Plan (Plan C). For Medicare Advantage plans, they are mostly HMOs and can require a referral for you to see a specialist.

We will work with you over the phone, present you with customized analysis and employ the use of Priority Mail to get the job done.

Below is a brief explanation of what original Medicare covers. It is important to note that medicare part A and B on its own will only cover some not all of your healthcare expenses. Part C or a Medicare Advantage plan will some if not all of what medicare does not cover.

Medicare Part A

Medicare Part A will cover Medicare inpatient care, as well as hospital care, a skilled nursing facility, and in some cases, at home. At the age of 65, a lot of people become eligible for Medicare Part A if they have been collecting retirement benefits courtesy of the Social Security Administration.

Medicare Part B

Medicare Part B (medical insurance) covers medical services and supplies that are essential to treating your medical condition. This may consist of outpatient care, ambulance services, preventive services, and durable medical equipment. It also entails rehabilitative services and part-time home health.

Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C)

Medicare Advantage program is jointly executed by the Federal government and private insurance companies with some plans that can be as little as $0. Some may even include dental, vision, hearing and prescription drug coverage. Call us now to speak to a licensed medicare agent.

Medicare Part D

This is a prescription drug benefit program initiated via the Medicare Prescription Drug Act of 2003. It is also known as the Medicare Modernization Act.

Enrollment

To enroll in Medicare, you have three months before you turn 65 and three months after. This seven month period is critical because:

  • There is a cost penalty attached to Part B and Part D if you fail to enroll within the seven month window period.
  • You’re guaranteed acceptance to a Medicare Supplement plan within the enrollment period. However, outside the open enrollment, your application may be declined for medical reasons.